2019

AUGUST FROM OUR PASTORS

Giving Thanks for Hardship

“For you, God, tested us; you refined us like silver. You brought us into prison and laid burdens on our backs. You let people ride over our heads; we went through fire and water, but you brought us to a place of abundance.” (Psalm 66:10-12)

Psalm 66 begins as prayer of praise. “Say to God, ‘How awesome are your deeds!’” (verse 3). “Come and see what God has done, His awesome deeds for mankind!” (verse 5). What are these deeds? Verse 6:  “He turned the sea into dry land, they passed through the waters on foot…He has preserved our lives and kept our feet from slipping.” (verses 6,9). But interspersed with an expression of thanks and praise to God for His wonderworking and deliverance, we find these verses “For you, God, tested us; you refined us like silver. You brought us into prison and laid burdens on our backs.” These hardly seem like pleasant experiences and reasons for giving God thanks. Do I wake up and give God thanks for the pain in my back? Do I thank God for the disappointment I feel when the thing I hoped for doesn’t happen? 

Hardship, trials, pain are not fun things to go through, and no, they are not always caused by God. In the book of Genesis, Joseph finds himself bruised and abandoned in a well not because God desired him to go through suffering, but because Joseph’s brothers, filled with jealousy, wanted to get rid of him (Genesis 37:19). 

But sometimes the burdens on our backs are from God. Not only are they sometimes from God, but we might also consider them a gift of God. They are God’s method for preserving us, protecting us, and making us more like Him. The Bible refers to these kinds of hardships employed by God as discipline:  “God disciplines us for our good, in order that we may share in His holiness. No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it.” (Hebrews 12:10b-11). As the verses say, no discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. A broken foot, a sickness, a separation from family or friends — none of these things seem good at the time. But when the wound begins to heal, when relationships begin to be restored and we begin to see how God has shaped and sculpted our character, as we reflect on the lessons we’ve learned, we can see that God was loving us all the way through that trial. In fact, He was loving us more than if had He done nothing, more than if He had not stepped in to do His work. His discipline in itself was an act of love. 

In the face of trials, let us not give up hope, but let us turn to God in obedience and faith. And let us be encouraged by God’s words:  “Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, and faithful in prayer.” (Romans 12:12)

In Jesus’ Love,

Pastors Garritt and Sanette 

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